Tag Archives: Nurse Empowerment

Nurse Boss-a blog series dedicated to nurses

Welcome to the 19th installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I can not believe this is the 19th interview on the Nurse Boss blog! My life and business has evolved immensely since started this blog five months ago. I want to share my why with you to give you some background on where this all came from.

My name is Lisbeth. I have been a nurse for 18 years. After hitting a wall about five years ago when I felt content with life and work, but unfulfilled, I started a mission to create a healthy lifestyle that allowed me to weave my nursing acumen into a lifestyle on my own terms. The only two requirements: it had to be in service to others and it had to light my soul on fire and make me feel alive (mentally, emotionally, physically, and spiritually).

This is where Healthy Nurse by Design was born. I help nurses create a lifestyle on their terms in a way that makes them feel alive and provides service on a large scale. My mission is to up the vibe of the nursing collective. The choice to suffer is yours, but it is certainly not mandatory.

Nurses are leaving the profession in droves. Nurses are leaving far too much on the table and not tapping into their full potential in the work place. We need nurses more now than ever before, but only nurses who want to serve in a healthy way that does not negate their own body, mind, and soul in the process.

The Nurse Boss blog is a simple and fun way to shine a light on what is possible when you culminate your savvy, nursing acumen, and imagination in life and work.

This is just another way I can serve nurses. I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses to see that nursing can be whatever they want it to be and that it certainly isn’t confined to the walls of a hospital.

A Nurse Boss is more than a role or job he/she has, it’s a certain energy, a vibe, a mindset.  A Nurse Boss has an uplifting energy and loves helping others, but not to the detriment of his/her own well-being.

A Nurse Boss believes in their own self worth and can articulate the value they bring to the table with ease. The only limit is their imagination.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul.

A Nurse boss walks their talk and are open to receive the abundance that is theirs because they know that giving and receiving are the same.

A Nurse Boss has a solid foundation deeply rooted in a growth, not fear-based mindset. As a result, opportunities are always presenting themselves. From the vantage point of a Nurse Boss, there is always abundance without the need for lack or struggle.

My intention is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

Now for today’s Nurse Boss!  Lynne Martin Moloughney is a nurse, mother, grandmother, business owner, and legacy builder. I met Lynne on social media and we became quick friends. She is has the generosity and compassion of a saint and makes a practice of pointing out the good in others. She was my mentor in learning the art of using periscope!

Lynne Martin Moloughney

Lynne Martin Moloughney

1. What are you doing now?

Currently, I am a mom to six wonderful children, a wife to a very supportive man of 24 years and a grandmother to one. I am also a substitute school nurse and building a legacy business, coaching people to health and financial success.

2. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

As for nursing as a whole, YES!! I specifically remember being in Kindergarten and being asked, ”What do you want to be when you grow up?” Without hesitation, I responded, “A NURSE!” Followed by a comment from my friend.. “Yeah, you will change your mind a million times before you grow up!” I was devastated and got very defensive…. “You are wrong. Yes, I will!” and was determined from there to make that dream a reality. Yes, I can remember stumbling from that dream one time, but I pushed through.

As for building a legacy business, I was approached by a friend to join her in doing the same. I was living paycheck to paycheck and something had to be done about it. And I knew it had to be me to make the difference required.

3. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

I truly believe our soul purpose here on this Earth is to help others by providing service. That service could be as small as sharing your “story” so that it resonates with someone else. As a nurse, we have the ability to help others by sharing our compassion and empathy. It is a special profession that provides a service of healing in more ways than one.

4. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?

The most ultimate characteristic of being a “nurse boss” is always standing in integrity. It is so important for others to see that we as nurses can not only can take care of our patients, but ourselves as well. Mind, body and soul….

5. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it?

The biggest obstacle I faced was overcoming my FEARS. Fears of failure, other people’s opinion and fear of success.Overcoming victim mentality was a large part of me! Everything happened TO me, not FOR me.

If it were not for personal development and meditation.. I do not know that I would have pursued my business. I worked on my spiritual journey because God has always been a huge part of my life. Learning to believe in myself, my life purpose and what I am doing was the hardest part.

6. What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

Sleep! LOL… I worked 12 hour nights as a NICU RN prior to subbing and building a business.

Seriously, it allows me time. Being a mom to six, this business allows me the freedom to build wherever I choose in the pockets of time, I create!

7. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo?

Look deeply into your soul. The only thing that can change that is YOU! Take action and believe in yourself…. All action negates negative emotion.

8. What resources can you share for nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

Explore all of your options. But, once you make a decision… COMMIT and NEVER GIVE UP! Always be working on yourself and remember that things don’t happen TO you, they happen FOR you!

9. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

I have 3 🙂 Immaculata by Marianne Williamson for my prayers

The Book of Awakening by Mark Nepo for daily Inspiration

Meet Your Soul by Elisa Romeo for my spirit

10. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?

HMMM…I LOVE food! But, there is nothing like a good HAMBURGER in my book!

11. How can we get in touch with you?

732­-456-­4335

[email protected]

LinkedIN:Lynne Moloughney,RN

https://www.facebook.com/lynne.moloughney

https://www.instagram.com/mommy4G2B

Thank you for your energy and taking the time to read Nurse Boss. Please share with us what are you doing to own your nursing acumen, creativity, and imagination?

If you want to join our movement to up the vibe of the nursing collective, join us over of Facebook at NurseBossTribe http://bit.ly/2aE9vkh

Keep shining your light,

xo,

Lisbeth

#NurseBoss

Nurse Boss-a blog for nurses

Welcome to the 16th installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses.

My hope is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul. A nurse boss walks their talk and they are open to receive the abundance that is theirs.  

I was attracted to today’s Nurse Boss from the minute we connected on social media. His energy and optimism are magnetic. He has a heart of gold, a quick wit and a wildly adventurous spirit. Allow me to introduce Robb Hillman, actor turned registered nurse and life coach. Chances are, he will prompt you to think differently about how you view your life.

robb

1. What are you doing now?

I am an RN and a Certified Life Coach. I help nurses who want to feel better. Who are tired of feeling frustrated and undervalued at the end of their shift, and instead want to deliberately empower themselves so that they can feel confident and satisfied instead.

2. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

Heh, well, let’s just say I haven’t led a “conventional” kind of life. I was living in New York City as a theater actor, and then 9/11 happened, and like a lot of people in NY I changed the way I was thinking about my life. I hung on just long enough to do a Broadway show (directed by Baz Luhrmann of “Moulin Rouge” fame), but then headed back to school and became a nurse.

I’ve always been an intuitive person, but working in psych really gave me a great window into how coaching principles – deliberately trying to be happy, for example – really made a difference for my patients. And once I started using the ideas on myself, and saw how tiny perspective shifts could totally change my entire life – I was hooked.

3. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

I think nursing really prepares us to handle anything. We are the best problems solvers this side of MacGyver. No matter how ridiculous our patient load is, no matter how many family members are giving us grief, no matter how sick our patients get – we are there to pick up the pieces and make sure that things get done. And we do it, day after day after day. This is great practice to then go on to do anything – change specialties, create our own job on our own terms, or to just figure out how to be happy.

4. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?

A nurse boss has a superpower, and that superpower is optimism. I think all nurses are optimists at heart. Now there are plenty of people who would try to mock me for saying that. They would say that optimism is naive, and that nurses are just too gritty and “realistic” to be a Pollyanna. But anyone who thinks optimism is weak and silly completely misunderstands optimism.

Being an optimist doesn’t mean ignoring the “real world”, it means refusing to let the external world dictate how you have to live, and what you have to feel. A true optimist is a badass who is stronger than the world.

Most of us became nurses because we wanted to help people. To help them as they heal, and sometimes to help them as they die. The optimist knows they can help, regardless of the outcome. Otherwise, why would you want to be a nurse?

Also, google “optimism + health”, you might be surprised to see the wealth of evidence- based research out there that shows pretty clearly how optimism is good for your health. In my quest to have a totally awesome life, I’m certainly not leaving such a useful superpower off the table.

5. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it?

As a new nurse, I was definitely tempted to use cynicism and “venting” as relief mechanisms against the seemingly unending stress and frustration I was feeling. What I eventually realized though was that while they provided temporary relief, they never actually helped me feel better, they distracted me but never charged up my batteries. Once I accepted that my natural optimism was a gift and not a curse, and that I could find much better ways of taking care of myself other than complaining (which was just training my brain to constantly look for the negative so I’d have something to talk about), I started enjoying my job a whole lot more.

6. What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

The thing I’ve always wanted, more than anything else, was freedom. When I was an actor I was free to explore my artistry without having a typical full-time 9-5 job. As a nurse I was free to not worry about money as I got out of debt and started building a retirement. As a coach I do all of my work by phone/online, so I am literally free to be anywhere in the world. I sold all my belongings and have been traveling the world full time for almost two years so far. A few months ago I was down in Uruguay celebrating hitting country #40. The traveling is excellent self-care, while still allowing me to work with clients and help nurses feel better and get the results they want. I’m free.

7. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo?

The inertia of the status quo is immense.

So many of us trick ourselves into thinking that there is a benefit to tolerating “the devil we know”. I call shenanigans on that line of thinking. Staying put is great if you love what you’re doing. But that is very different from tolerating what you’re doing.

A deceptively simple exercise I give my clients is to make a list of the things that you want. Most really struggle to come up with more than a few things. But if you don’t know where you are headed, how are you going to get there? Some people like creating elaborate vision boards, some like a simple paper list, do whatever motivates you the most. But write things down. Don’t hold back, or play small, but be honest. Do you want to save as many lives as possible? Do you want to retire early? Do you want to change specialties? Do you want to find a job you like and stay there for 35 years? Do you want to get married, or to be an entrepreneur, or to move someplace warmer? Having goals can be hugely empowering.

And then, go for a walk. There is nothing like some physical activity to clear your brain and get you out of your head. I walk 10K steps a day at the bare minimum, and I usually have my best ideas either while or just after I’ve been walking.

8. What resources can you share for nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

Find a community! I very much believe the adage that you are the average of the five people you hang out with most. If you want to go for an advanced degree, you are going to ask people who have already done it. If you want to change specialties you are going to talk to people in that specialty. If you want to be an entrepreneur, talk to some entrepreneurs! There are many different directions a nurse entrepreneur can go – legal nursing, opening a staffing company, direct sales, teaching skills such as CPR, coaching, to name just a few – so find the people who are doing what you want to be doing and get to know them.

The thing to remember is that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel. If other people are doing it, so can you. And having friends is only going to help you. Some people complain that wealthy people talk about money only because they have it. I say, they have money because they talk about it. Whatever it is that you want to do, find your people and start talking about it.

Now for fun:

9. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

The Power of Habit by Charles Duhigg. My inner nurse and coach both are absolutely fascinated with how our brains work and why we develop the habits (both good and bad) that we do.

10. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?

Khao soi, which I discovered while spending a month in northern Thailand. It is a curry made from coconut milk and is so delicious I basically stopped eating all other Thai food, which is pretty high praise because I love Thai food. Now I’m hungry.

11. How can we get in touch with you?

Please do, I’m a people person and I love to connect!

Website: http://www.robbhillmancoaching.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/robbhillmancoaching/ 

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/robbhillman

Nurse Boss Soul School-the first of its kind

To be of true service to others, you must first nurture your own soul.
What does that even mean?
Nurturing your own soul means getting really clear on what it is that you love and desire for your one precious life.
It means showing up FIRST for yourself with zero guilt.
It means owning your gifts and passions without the need to explain yourself.
It means living every single day in a way that honors you and your desires.
It means letting go of the deathgrip that you have on the fear, lack, and struggle mindset forever.
It means more:
laughter. joy. fun. blessings. abundance. freedom. flow. ease. and alignment.
This is NOT something you learn in nursing school.
When you nurture your own soul & spirit, you become a vessel of unlimited abundance that you can share with others. Every thing is easier.

The outcome: Living true to your passions & talents in a way that honors both your own soul & those whom you care for.

Smart. Safe. Nurturing. Fulfilling. Empowering. Selfless service. Greatest good for ALL.
If you desire a safe. fun. simple. empowering. enlightening. energetic and timely course to learn to care for your soul, I invite you to consider enrolling in the only school of it’s kind, Nurse Boss Soul School.
I have captured all of my training (registered nurse 18 years/chronic condition coaching 5+ years/yoga teacher certification/holistic stress management certification/certified integrative health coach certification) coupled with the success of my private coaching clients and created a school that is accessible, profoundly simple, and extremely moving in an easy to use format.

I felt called to create this school after overcoming a time in my nursing career 5 years ago when despite enjoying my life & my rewarding job in a busy electrophysiology lab, I felt spiritually & energetically stuck.

I knew I was not living my full potential, but I had NO clue about how to get unstuck. I listened to the nudging of my soul & was able to show up in a bigger way.

I am passionate about sharing this with nurses. I never want another nurse to feel isolated, trapped, and alone like I felt.

I am on a mission to up the vibe of the nursing collective.

Our time to stop playing small has arrived.

At Nurse Boss Soul School you will learn simple, yet profound tools to nurture your own mind, body, & soul, with me as your guide in a safe, loving, & supportive environment.

All online from the comfort of your own home.

A group experience with other amazing nurses who seek to nurture their mind, body, and soul.

12 weeks. 6 soul lessons (pdf’s/audio/video files). 6 group coaching calls. Private FB community. All the love and support I can give.
Benefits:
  • Never again will you question whether or not you should nurture your own soul.
  • You will release the limiting beliefs and energy patterns for good that keep you stuck in self-doubt, shame, and struggle.
  • You will have the confidence and inner knowing that you really are the creator of your life & now you know how to tap into your awesome to create the life & career that you used to believe was unattainable. No idea or dream is too crazy or off limits.
  • You have the tools to keep your emotional, physical, & spiritual health in the highest possible frequency for your highest good.
  • You have a vibe, an attractive energy about you because you have aligned your beliefs with your desires to attract exactly what you want.
  • Your habit of living in doubt, guilt, and shame is replaced by a lifestyle of abundance, confidence, and freedom.
Value: $1900
Your Investment: $479
that’s two payments of $239.50 or

three payments of $159.67
The magic starts May 16th.  
To guarantee your spot in the Nurse Boss Soul School, let me know by commenting below or email me at [email protected].
I look forward to helping you own your awesome
Peace & love,
Lisbeth

Healthy Nurse by Design & Nurse Boss

Nurse Boss-a blog series for nurses

Welcome to the 10th installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses.

My hope is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul. A nurse boss walks their talk and they are open to receive the abundance that is theirs.

I am delighted to share the work of Nurse Boss, Beth Boynton. We have not met in person, but her energy and passion are pervasive. I love her promotion of  the empowerment of nurses and bringing “Improvoscopy:Serious Play for Safe Care” into healthcare. What a great way to teach excellent communication skills in difficult situations in a fun, laid back manner.

Beth-Boynton-photo

1. What are you doing now?

I’m developing, promoting, and providing workshops that use improv techniques to teach emotional intelligence and interpersonal skills to healthcare professionals. I’ve been teaching and writing about communication etc for over a decade and these experiential techniques are lots of fun and the learning can be profound.

I believe that all healthcare professionals and organizations should have access to some of the fundamental experiences because they can help us make healthcare safer and more compassionate. For patients and ourselves! Not all have time or money to afford hiring a consultant so I want to build a free website that will help others to teach a few improv activities. I have a crowdsource funding project going on right now and am asking for help in promoting and backing. It’s called “Improvoscopy: Serious Play for Safe Care”. (If you can help I’d be very grateful!)

2. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

I love this question. I don’t think consciously, but on some spiritual level, yes. My undergrad degree was a BS in biochemistry with a minor in theatre and communication. That was before nursing! 🙂

My Mom passed away a few months ago and I’ve been reflecting a lot on my journey and family and do believe that helping people communicate, collaborate, and manage conflict more effectively is my life’s work. I remember over 20 years ago, as an Occupational Health Nurse trying to start a business that focused on avoiding adversarial relationships between injured workers and management! 🙂

3. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

There are so many specialties and career paths not to mention work opportunities all over the world 24/7/365. Nurses who know what they love or are figuring that out can earn a living and do meaningful work and weave that in with their life circumstances. I’ve written 2 books and developed my consulting business while working per diem in home health and long term care for many years!

4. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?

The ability to inspire (and support) others to do and become their very best and as you say in your wonderful definition, while taking good care of themselves too. Respecting self and others seems integral and no surprise that both are part of emotional intelligence.

5. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome them?

There is a lot of resistance to nurses being fully empowered. More complicated because it involves a shift in power from dynamics that are very old. Gender, social norms, religion, history, even survival are in the mix!

Part of my success is persistence and a compelling sense of purpose. I’m also continuing to learn that it isn’t my job to “make” people listen or speak up, it is my job to use my gifts, skills, and wisdom to provide resources to those wanting to develop the skills. This interview is an example of time well-spent for me and I appreciate those who are curious and interested in my story.

6. What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

I can be healthier in mind, body, and spirit. I almost left healthcare in the early 2000s because I was learning about being assertive for myself. (I was always good at being assertive for patients but not so great at identifying and speaking up for my own needs.) I found it very difficult to practice my new ‘self-care’ skills in toxic cultures. Soooooo, I went to grad school for organization and management. I focused on group dynamics, coaching, organizational development, emotional intelligence (EQ) and the like. My practicum was a model that used theatre activities to build emotional intelligence in children. I did that for a while and then had a chance to teach a graduate course for healthcare professionals.

I got turned on to healthcare again by the privilege of working with some passionate students and realized that we need the same stuff in nursing etc! In my textbook, “Successful Nurse Communication: Safe Care, Healthy Workplaces, & Rewarding Careers”, I have a whole chapter on self care. I mention this because the publisher, F.A. Davis has been so supportive of me being honest and so indirectly are supporting the work nurses do. It helps me to keep the faith that positive change is happening and support is out there as I become better at looking in the right places and knowing what I’m looking for!

7. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo?

Make yourself a priority! I think it is super important to do at least one thing that gives you joy or at least supports something that feels important to you. Know that you deserve to work in a culture where you feel supported and that if you don’t, you are not alone. Changing that may be tough with financial demands or life circumstances and getting unstuck may be a long process of discovery. Get help from your friends and family. I had a lot of help from a psychotherapist and feel that the work we did together continues on and has been very powerful.

8. What resources can you share for nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

The National Nurses in Business Association is a great starting place. There is a FB page for nurse entrepreneurs too. It can be wise to keep your “day job” as it can take a while to get your business off the ground. Passion about your goal and patience will help too!

Now for fun:
9. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

    The Glass Palace by Amitav Ghosh. A 3-generation saga about the struggles of a young boy and his eventual wife and some history of India, Burma, and Malaysia. (A special book b/c I was visiting my son in India when he bought it and then loaned to me!)

10. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?

Extra crispy fried chicken! Emmmmmm!

11. How can we get in touch with you?

[email protected], www.confidentvoices.com,

603-205-3509

How becoming a yoga teacher helped improve my communication with doctors and made me a better nurse

I am sure you are curious about what yoga has to do with my nurse career……everything!

Never in a million years did I think that completing yoga teacher training would improve my nursing career or make communicating with doctors easier.

Then it happened.

I have practiced nursing for seventeen years. Ten of those, I spent working in a busy electrophysiology lab (that’s the circuitry division of the cardiac catheterization lab).

These were by far some of the best days of my practice! For those of you who practice in an operative type setting are aware of the relationships you create when working in this environment.

For those who do not work in this type of environment, I will share, that when you work in this type of setting, you become very close with all of the people who are part of that team. The doctors, nurses, x-ray technicians, device company clinicians, and others who support all the equipment you use in your day to day operations treating patients. For me, it was patients with heart rhythm disturbances. Working in such conditions, gives you a back stage pass to all the ins and outs of these team members’ lives and their idiosyncrasies.

Every human has their “buttons.” When under stress, a time crunch, or just having a crummy day these buttons get pushed and depending on the person (and whether or not they’ve had their coffee, it’s a full moon, or mercury is in retrograde), the people on the receiving end may receive an unwarranted dose of yelling or personal attacks.

It is ok to be crabby once in a while, but when people start yelling at others or throwing instruments, that crosses the line.

Prior to my yoga experience, whenever a physician was starting to engage in showing their frustration or anger by yelling, I would shut down and start to tread lightly, as if I were walking on egg shells. It never got to the point that I would not interject or interrupt the doctor on my patient’s behalf, but it always made me feel uneasy and like I was on high alert. It was as if they had some special power over me, and that I should be afraid of them.

This is never a good feeling to have as a nurse, because it can influence whether or not you speak up for your patient, which is never a good outcome.

Fast forward to my yoga teacher training. One of the doctors that I worked with agreed to be my “student” for yoga teacher training. I was both flabbergasted and ecstatic. A busy doctor taking the time and energy to help me complete my teacher training! Score! The exam went swell and after I received my certification the relationship that I had with said doctor changed forever.

I don’t know if it was that he had more respect for me, or what, but after that, I never every felt threatened, afraid, or worried about walking on egg shells again. It was as if we were now on a level playing field. I knew more about something than he did, and we were now equals in my mind.

At times when I could tell he was getting frustrated I would say, “you’re going to have to drop and give me fifteen chaturanga dandasana’s (a complex yoga move) if you keep it up.” That queue became his barometer for when he needed to cool it with his negative vibes. In an instant he would lighten up. That relationship spilled over into all of my relationships with doctors and made communicating with them so much easier.

I had this epiphany, that just because someone has MD after their name, does not give them the right to talk to me in a way that feels threatening or unkind.  I realized that we were on a level playing field and that they put their pants on just like me, one leg at a time.

This helped make me the best possible nurse, because I no longer stressed or walked on egg shells in certain situations. When we are under stress; especially chronically, we are far more likely to make errors. This puts us and our patients at risk. I had less stress (less potential for errors) and felt even more comfortable speaking up on behalf of myself and my patients (patient advocacy is crucial in great care, nurses are the eyes and ears of our patients and it is our duty to speak up when there is a change in their condition or a need to re-evaluate a previous plan of care). A win-win for all.

I respect and honor the hard work and schooling that doctors go through, but I will not allow a doctor, or anyone else for that matter to be disrespectful or rude to me. Having more education than me is no grounds for that type of behavior.

So, if you are feeling afraid or like you have to walk on egg shells at work, I get you. The great news is that you don’t have to go through yoga teacher training to change how you interact with people who are difficult. This applies to anyone who is being disrespectful to you and it doesn’t have to be at the workplace. No one deserves to be mistreated or treated disrespectfully.

The same goes for you, if you are the one treating others poorly. It goes both ways. You do not have the right to mistreat others.

When people are projecting that behavior, it is because they feel bad about themselves and use it as a way to make themselves feel better. Stop taking the bait.

The person being disrespectful is no better than you and they do not deserve your time or energy when they are speaking down to you or being disrespectful in some way. The best solution to this is to call them out on their behavior and say something like, “I can see that you are upset, however, I do not deserve to be treated this way and I am happy to give you my time and attention when you can treat me respectfully.” Then simply walk away.

Like attracts like. When we focus on our internal power (self-respect), we attract more power (respect). When we focus on our weaknesses, or what’s not “right” with us, we attract situations that highlight our weaknesses.

We all have parts of ourselves that we can improve upon. I call these opportunities. Continue to work on your “opportunities”, but also try to focus on what’s good and right with you, not on what’s not. You will attract positive, healthy, and empowering opportunities on your path. This will further empower you.

Please let me know what you are doing to improve your relationships with difficult people on or off the job and what has been successful for you. This post is for uplifting comments and encouragement. Let’s hear what’s working for you.

Sending you love and empowerment in life and work,

Lisbeth