Tag Archives: Nursing

Nurse boss-a blog dedicated to nurses

Welcome to the 22nd installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses.

My hope is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul. A Nurse Boss walks their talk and they are open to receive the abundance that is theirs.

A Nurse Boss is more than a role or job he/she has, it’s a certain energy, a vibe, a mindset.  A Nurse Boss has an uplifting energy and loves helping others, but not to the detriment of his/her own well-being.

Today’s Nurse Boss, Joyce Harrell has so much to share with you about life, career, and whole body healing. I love how she transformed her nursing burnout into a new nursing career that is bringing healing not only to herself, but thousands of others. My favorite part of her interview is her ABC’s of personal growth. 

Joyce Harrell, RN

1.What are you doing now? 

I work PRN as an Oncology Nurse while I’m building my business as a Wellness Coach. I share whole person wellness concepts through a program called the Wellness Inventory. In addition to being a wellness coach, I integrate aromatherapy and herbal support for my clients. I’m part owner in an on-site Wellness Center, and I also have an online business that mirrors my wellness center. Future plans are in the works to create CEU Aromatherapy and Herbal programs for nurses. I just returned from Europe where I completed an Aromatherapy Palliative Care program for health care providers. I’m going to be creating a holistic Palliative Care program locally, and also in the future train nurses here in the United States along the same path.

I also have a blog that is monetized. I write as an integrative wellness coach on stress management, mindset issues, and aromatherapy/herbal support. I also write some articles specifically for nurses on wellness.

2. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

I have studied and been interested in integrative health for over 30 years now. However, the wellness coaching part entered my life a few years after I experienced a severe burnout period in my nursing career 10 years ago. It wasn’t until I discovered the healing tools as I studied wellness coaching that my life experienced a shift. I realized at that time, I experienced the severe burnout because I wasn’t equipped with tools needed to navigate through my stress and overwhelm.

3. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

Nursing is such a healing art and science. You start with critical thinking skills, but those are enhanced with experience. You gain experience dealing with people (easy and difficult people). You learn how to prioritize tasks, and also how to lead and delegate. Holistic nursing is geared toward healing of mind, body, and spirit. As we learn to honor our own holistic framework, we are able to honor dreams and inner passions for creating a life we love.

4. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss? 

Confidence! Confidence in your ability to achieve your goals and dreams.  For me, I accomplish this with what I call my ABC’s of personal growth.  A) Authentic living. This is honoring our dreams, passions, desires, and purpose. Being authentic means to be true to who we are, even when opposition comes and it feels we are swimming upstream against popular thoughts. True pioneers were never among the masses. B) Boundaries.  Being able to set boundaries for our own peace, safety, healing, and path. There are many voices calling out to us to get us off course, and inviting us down paths that don’t resonate. Again being authentic and on point to our goals and dreams will allow us to say no when we want to say no, and to say yes to those experiences which are part of our journey.  Better is always the sidetrack for BEST. C) Creativity… Allowing our creative side to flow is essential to our health and success as a nurse boss. Often the left brain side (scientific) takes over and while we need this part to operate the business side of things, it’s imperative to set aside creative times for growth and new ideas. Creativity sessions are where I get my best ideas for my journey. This is where I dream, grow, and experience.

5. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it? 

My biggest obstacle is actually me. Since I’ve started my journey I’ve participated in several mindset programs to shift my thinking from “I’m not good enough”, “who will want what I have to offer”, to “My experiences and passion attract those who need what I am offering”. It’s been very empowering for me personally to realize I offer what people need. I believe most people’s biggest obstacle is their own personal self and lack of confidence of being able to be successful doing something outside the norm. We nurse bosses are really pioneers.

6. What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

In my role as a wellness coach I have the time to be supportive in empowering my client to tap into the answers which already lie within. I’m able to be more holistic and support whole person wellness. I find even as a nurse who still works some hours within a traditional nursing role, I implement some of my wellness coaching skills, but it’s not the same. There is not time allotted or emphasis truly given to be able to help my patients look at body mind and spirit. The emphasis of course in most traditional settings is on the physical (unless you are a mental health nurse).

7. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo?

Nurses who feel stuck in their current role should explore what it is they really want to do. Sometimes nurses accept roles they really aren’t happy in. So, look at my ABC’s.  Be Authentic when you are looking for a position, or when looking for something beyond the status quo. Don’t accept a role you know isn’t a fit. Set your boundaries, and learn to say yes only when you know it’s right. Then have creative sessions to explore what you really want from your life. It is more time? More money? What are interest or hobbies or passions you have outside of nursing? Is there a way to be creative and “marry” the two? Nursing and your passion? Think outside the box.  Look for a nurse mentor who is already doing what you want to do. Mentor with them.

8. What resources can you share for nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

I am a member of the National Nurses in Business. This is a great resource with many ideas and resources to start your own business.

Now for fun:

9. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

I wish I could say I had a mystery novel, or fun fiction on my nightstand. I don’t. I’ve always got 2-3 books going at one time. 

I’ve got Nurse Herbalist by Dr. Martha Libster.   

Complementary Therapy in End Of Life Care by Madeleine Kerkhof-Knapp Hayes.

And the latest copy of Beginnings from American Holistic Nurses Association.

10. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be

This is a fun one.  For a non-healthy food, I’d have to say Ice Cream. More specifically: Chocolate-Peanut Butter Gelato.  And for a Healthy food, I could eat an avocado every day for the rest of my life! Love them!

11. How can we get in touch with you? 

The best way to get in touch with me is through email. My email is [email protected].  You can also find my writings at http://www.joyceharrell.com

 

Thank you for your energy and taking the time to read Nurse Boss. Please share with us what you are doing to own your nursing acumen, creativity, and imagination.

If you want to join the Nurse Boss movement to up the vibe of the nursing collective, join us over on Facebook at Nurse Boss Tribe http://bit.ly/2aE9vkh

Keep shining your light,

XO,

Lisbeth

Nurse Boss

Do you have a professional mentor?

Do you have a professional mentor or someone who just gets you whom you can talk to about anything?

I have been a nurse for 17 years and my first professional mentor was Kathy, a registered nurse that I had been paired with on the telemetry floor in a hospital where I began my nursing career.

Kathy was super nice and had such patience with me. She was also very funny, which was a bonus in my book. Humor is a non-negotiable in my life.

I was part of the very first new grad program at my hospital and I know it is the reason I have been able to become such a great nurse. The new grad program provided a stable foundation for me.

I was with a group of ten other new grads for our first year of practice together. We met every week to review: new skills, standards of practice, and to talk about our fears and our wins.

I knew that someone always had my back. I felt safe. I felt connected. It felt like I mattered.

This is the best possible way to start a career in nursing. There are so many unknowns and there are no shortage of opportunities to second guess yourself or situations that may make you want to run and hide.

I will forever have gratitude for those mentors and that experience. I draw on it often.

That experience taught me early on that it is not only ok, but wise to ask for help or to clarify if you don’t know something. This is the courageous thing to do and is crucial when considering your actions, could mean the difference between a great outcome and a sentinel event.

I have been fortunate to have such wonderful mentors throughout my nursing career. Another one of my favorite mentors was Judy. She mentored me in the electrophysiology lab. She was part mentor, part mom. She was awesome and gave me such confidence in a high tech, fast paced working environment. A funny tip she shared with me that I can remember that is not related to nursing was to iron your clothes while watching tv!!! I love that idea, but I don’t watch tv anymore…………Still pure genius.

Despite all of the amazing mentors and support I have had throughout my nursing career, there was a time, about five years ago when I did not really know what to do or who to talk to about a feeling I had. It was this inner energy that I was not living up to my true potential.

I felt stifled and burned out. Not just stressed out and nursing kind of tired, but like, energetically and spiritually empty.

There was something more I was supposed to be offering the world, but I couldn’t quite put my finger on it. I had this inner longing going on inside my soul and there wasn’t really anyone who I could talk to about it. It was very isolating.

After loads of soul searching, yoga teacher training, nutrition school, and healing energy work, I have discovered that my gift is serving nurses. I am fulfilling my soul and spirit in my work as a life coach. I help nurses become their own Nurse Boss.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who knows her purpose. Her mission is clear as mud! She has married her talents with her passions to create the life and career of her desires in service to others while also honoring her own body, mind, and soul. She is open to receive the abundance that her mindset and energy bring forth and does so without an ounce of guilt or feeling selfish. She is in the flow of receiving as much as she is giving, creating a life of balance and bliss.

I help nurses feel safe, connected, and like you matter.

I teach nurses the most important tools that you don’t learn in nursing school. Self-love first.

I help nurses feel the way I did in my new grad program. I offer you support, time, energy, and simple tools that get you re-aligned with your core, your true purpose, so that you may create the life and career of your dreams. You first. No exceptions. No guilt. No more struggling. Pure joy. Abundance. Alignment. Laughter. Fun.

I am having such fun and success with my private coaching clients, that I have decided to create an online version that will knock your socks off. I have poured my heart and soul into this course. It is my baby, her name is Nurse Boss Soul School. This program is full of soul. Your soul and your heart. You will learn how to reconnect to your heart and your soul.

If you want a cheerleader, a nurse who has your back, who loves you up, and reminds you of your own awesome, then I am the girl for you. You can have all of this in the privacy of your own home when you enroll in my Nurse Boss Soul School.

If you are ready to release struggle and lack for good. This is your ticket. Joy and ease are your birthright. Your years of lack and struggle have served their purpose. It is time to release that once and for all.

So………….are you ready to be your own Nurse Boss?

If so, please connect with me here so I can be sure to get you the details as soon as they are ready. Be the first to know

Hugs and love, Lisbeth

Healthy Nurse by Design and Nurse Boss

Nurse Boss-a blog series for nurses

I simply can not believe that today is the fifth interview of the Nurse Boss series. I knew I had a good idea when I got the download to do this, but I honestly had no idea what a powerful impact it would have in my life.

I have such deep respect and feel such a connection to the amazing Nurse Bosses that I have met through this opportunity.

Today’s interview comes from a nurse who I connected with on LinkedIN. We connected after she shared a lovely comment on my post, “Is your story keeping you stuck or helping you heal.” Meet Beverly Wheeler, Registered Nurse and nursing professor.

As advocates of individuals sharing our stories, we had an instant connection. Sharing our story is a profound path to not only healing ourselves, but sharing our gifts. Stories help us connect.

When I met Beverly, I knew I had to share what she was doing with story telling in her role as a nursing professor. Talk about making an impact on nursing students! Wow!

Beverly invited her nursing students at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing to write a short paper about a patient they had taken care of since entering nursing school who had inspired them and made them realize they were in the right profession. I just love Beverly’s wisdom in her words about nurses:

“Their essays show that while people enter the profession for numerous reasons, they all want to care for people—and not just patients.”

Nurses play a critical role in helping families start the healing process.”

“Whether it is holding a patient’s hand, talking to a patient, or being a shoulder to cry on, nurses do much more than take blood or carry out a doctor’s instructions.”

Beverly took these nurse stories and created a book, “Nursing Is Caring”. Read more about her book here: Nursing is Caring

Wheeler-Book-Image

What are you doing now?
I am presently a clinical assistant professor at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio School of Nursing, San Antonio, Texas

Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?
I never wanted to teach. I was a Clinical Nurse Specialist at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, MD when I was asked by a colleague at Marymount University, Arlington, VA if I would teach a nursing clinical in a hospital one day a week as an adjunct instructor for just one semester. I’m still not sure why, but I said yes and worked at the naval hospital full time and taught clinical nursing one day a week. At the end of the semester, my students convinced me to continue which I did for 6 more years. I left when my husband and I moved to Texas. Here is San Antonio I wanted something part time. Since I had learned to enjoy my students, I said yes when I was offered a part time clinical position here at UT.

Why is nursing a great launch pad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?
Nursing is so diversified. Nurses can work in any type of setting and do any type of nursing they like. They can also travel.

What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?
A nurse boss is a nurse who has administration and especially leadership qualities. He or she normally has had advanced education and/or training and overseas a nursing unit or larger area, not necessarily in a hospital. This person enjoys what he/she does overseeing and helping others in their areas.

What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it.
Nursing was a second career. Going to nursing school as a single mom with two small children and working full time was probably the hardest.

What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?
My present position is part time. With the exception of the days I am in the hospital with students, my time is flexible.

For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo.
I would advise them to look around and ask themselves what would they really like to do. Change can be scary, but do not be afraid to try something different. Talk to nurses who work in other areas.

What resources can you share with nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?
I have always worked for an agency and/or school and often at the same time. Doing on line research and talking to others who have their own gig would be my suggestion.

Now for fun:
What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?
Right now my own book is on my nightstand. I read a lot of nursing journals so sometimes, especially on Sundays; I will read a fiction novel for fun.

If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?
I honestly don’t know what that would be. The one thing that I frequently snack on is grapes.

How can we get in touch with you?
My email is [email protected] My book has a website, www.nursingiscaring.com

Nurse Boss-a blog series for nurses

Welcome to the 3rd installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses.

My hope is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul. A nurse boss walks their talk and they are open to receive the abundance that is theirs.

I would like to introduce Anne Taylor. She is a nurse that I had the pleasure of connecting with on LinkedIN. It’s amazing how your vibe really does attract your tribe! I absolutely love her story and how she turned pain and suffering into healing for herself, her family, and now others. The ultimate example of a Nurse Boss!   

annetaylor

1. What are you doing now?

I am the CEO of Scandic Health llc. We stream MusiCure-music as medicine to hospitals, clinic and the likes. At this moment I am in conversations with nurses and hospital administrators to peak their interest to MusiCure. Coming to the market with something completely new has its challenges.

2. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

I went to nursing school in Copenhagen Denmark, and really enjoyed being a nurse. I married my American husband in 1999 and moved to Miami Beach and started my US- nursing career. It was not so easy as it sounds, I worked as an assistant to the RN while I was studying for the NCLEX. I spoke English but not nursing English, it was a very difficult year but looking back it was a year where I learned a lot personally and professionally.

My spark to start my own company comes from a very painful time in my life when my daughter was extremely ill with anxiety and depression. She was 9 years old and so very ill that she needed hospitalization, our whole family was in a state of shock and pain. My mother came from Denmark to help out and she brought us our first MusiCure cd, she had bought it at the pharmacy as an over the counter medication.

MusiCure quickly became a daily part of our routine, it felt like my heart rate slowed down and my breathing was more calm. It was like a release deep within my soul, I saw my daughter sleep better and be able to relax and slowly enjoy life again. My daughter slowly got better and we as a family got stronger. At my very lowest I remember thinking I either do not tell anybody because mental illness has such a stigma or I stand up and share our story and hopefully inspire others. We lost friends and gained some new ones and I also started to use MusiCure in my practice as a nurse.

It was a slow process but after 2 years of having MusiCure heal us I knew I had to create some kind of platform to share. Scandic Health is named after my Scandinavian roots and health is to honor my daughter’s recovery.

3. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

Before I started nursing school I was told nursing is like a ladder, nursing has so many steps and can take you in so many directions. I do not know of any other profession where you can travel the world working, change working hours depending on your families’ needs and have such a huge impact on other people.

4. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?

Compassion and ability to keep the nursing team engaged, we are stronger together and nurses need to have each other’s back every shift.

5. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it.

I have had so many obstacles but they are also who I am today. A Norwegian nurse theorist Kari Martinsen talks about nurses as having “backpacks of knowledge” they carry with them through life and collects more on their way. Mine consists of my parents divorce, leaving my roots and moving to the US and my daughter’s illness.

Obstacles can also be life lessons even though they surely do not feel like it when you are in the eye of the storm. My biggest obstacle is by far my daughter’s fight back to a happy life and our family learning a new way of living by limiting stress and enjoying the moment.

I do not know if I overcame this obstacle, I more rode through it and came out wiser on the other end.

Time, give your self time.

6. What does your current  job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

I want to write a 30 min lunch break and bathroom breaks ☺

But on a serious note, it’s really about that I can now concentrate about my passion and share my story. As much as it scares me to do public speaking, I also feel empowered afterwards. I count my blessings each holiday I am off and able to spend with my family.

7. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo.

A nurse can only care for patients if she/he takes care of themselves first. I had to learn this the hard way. Please listen to your body when it tries to talk to you. If you have a desire to break out, take small steps and follow your deep nurse intuition cause it’s there, trust me.

8. What resources can you share with nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

Passion and authenticity is real and raw, other people will listen since its not selling, it’s sharing your story. Start small, one thought will lead to the next. It’s all a process. I talked out loud for many months to friends and family, their advice and encouragement got me to the point of a business plan. Rome was not built in one day and this is a process and each step teaches you something. LinkedIN has been a huge resource for me, I have gotten amazing contacts, like you ☺ 

Now for fun:

9. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

The Japanese Lover by Isabel Allende and the Mindful magazine.

10. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?

Avocado

11. How can we get in touch with you

My website is www.scandichealth.com and my email is [email protected]

Nurse Boss-A blog series for nurses

Welcome to the 1st installment of Nurse Boss. A blog series dedicated to nurses.

I was guided to create this series after a spark of creativity within my soul felt that it would help thousands of nurses.

My hope is that these interviews will ignite a spark in you or stir your inner landscape in a way that propels you to dream big and go after what it is that you desire in life and career.

A Nurse Boss is a nurse who has created a lifestyle that aligns their passion with their natural gifts and energy style in a way that helps others while also honoring their own body, mind, and soul. A nurse boss walks their talk and they are open to receive the abundance that is theirs.

I would like to introduce David Gomez. David and I met after he commented on my LinkedIN post “Nurses as Inventors”. You can read it here: http://bit.ly/1Q4BRPl

david-gomez

David and I became fast friends and I am delighted to share his insight, wisdom, and generosity with you in the first installment of Nurse Boss.

  1. What are you doing now?

These days I am running a medical device start up, iMT: infinitus Medical Technologies. We have been in business since 2013. Our first patient positioning product, the iON ESPS® ergonomic surgical positioning system, launched in 2015. The iON is a unique arm adduction product that serves as not just an improvement over current standards of care, it guides process improvements through its utility by standardizing a highly variable and injurious surgical position. At this year’s AORN conference in Anaheim we will launch our new Hadron FPLSTM system. Like the iON, this system is a benchmark product, but for the Trendelenburg surgical position. It can be used with or without the iON ESPS®.

After many years of clinical experience and wisdom gained in the OR, I decided instead of complaining about a lack of truly clinical focused product solutions, that I would do something about it and build a company around the ideas that I have had for years. It has been an honor and a privilege being a CRNA for the last 13 years, still practicing when I can. The experiences and relationships gained throughout my career have enriched my life immensely. What better testament to those relationships is there if I could somehow make a difference by creating products that served to improve safety for both patients and providers.

  1. Did you always have the desire to do what you are doing now or did someone or something create a spark in you that made you realize this was your calling?

Finding your true calling in life can come at any age. Some people know it from the time they are impressed upon by a subject or event early in their lives, while other’s sparks evolve over time, only after they have been exposed to life’s trials and tribulations. The spark can be either be extinguished or fanned to create a flame. Just make sure the fire doesn’t consume you! For me, I had great role models during my Navy years, following me into my profession

It takes courage to step out of your comfort zone. Life throws us curve balls anyway to remove us from our comfort, so in theory you are already prepared for the road to self-determination. You just have to make a conscious decision to step out and persevere.

I am truly blessed for having my family’s support, even when things have been grim. We have tremendous faith in God’s plan for us. Every time we have hit a seemingly insurmountable obstacle, we overcame with both wisdom, courage, and faith. My business partners have also been a strong motivator for. Trust me, it does take a village.

Understand that being prepared for success or failure is ok. Trying something new. As long as you have a good plan of attack, it’s more than most will ever try. Don’t ever worry about criticisms along the way, they should fuel you to succeed and try even more. Those who criticize have either no courage, or have become complacent with their own successes. Most successful people will serve as a sounding board and offer advice and encouragement to assist your journey. Stay away from those who want to charge you money!!!!!

  1. Why is nursing a great launchpad for nurses who want to create their own lifestyle doing what they love?

Nursing offers a wide degree of career options. Nursing education prepares you for the bare bones basics of care provision. The real career starts your first day on the floor, or in your respective care environments. The career opportunities available based on your degree are limitless.

Too many nurses (and care providers in general) become apathetic and jaded after years of being under appreciated and over utilized. When you feel overwhelmed and toxic, step back and reevaluate your position and perhaps seek another career within nursing. If at all possible, take a travel assignment and see the US, or even the world. Open your eyes to the world and understand how workplace cultures differ from hospital to hospital. Find one that fits your passion and goals towards career fulfillment.

  1. What is the ultimate characteristic of a nurse boss?

Nurse bosses or managers, where do I start? Healthcare is a dynamic beast. Politics, greed, and apathy have set us back on many levels. The Affordable Care Act, or as I like to call: the law of diminishing return, has transformed our careers in many ways, both seen and unseen.

Nurses both young and old, have entered this profession to make a difference. They wished to serve the needs of their patients, while providing themselves a long fulfilling career in an esteemed profession. The reality is that over the last 15 years, nurses quickly became second class citizens. They were over utilized and burdened to meet many, almost daily requirements, written by some clipboard committee under the auspices of improving care. Most have chosen to eat their young, discouraging the new generation of nurses from fulfilling their life long duty to patients.

As a result, nurses began leaving the profession after a few years of burn out, or took the only other option: management. This attrition allowed nurses with very little experience to assume management positions for which they were ill prepared. Suddenly we found ourselves surrounded by inadequate nurse managers who either chose the promotion, or attritional managers who were given the promotion due to their year(s) of service. When the ACA came along, these forces were assembled to provide even more unattainable metrics driven toward value driven patient outcomes.

But are all these new rules really necessary? Have we created a monster, a bureaucracy that serves only to create an endless set of rules and requirements that only serve to distract us from hands on, compassionate care? Who vets these requirements? What governing organization handles these requirements and then disseminates achievable goals for the benefit of providers and patients?

Nurse bosses should be both leaders and followers. They should listen to all constructive advice and criticisms and then form deductive processes for success. They should lead by example by continuing to work their respective environments from time to time, so they can keep up with the needs of their colleagues and their patients. Above all, they should question everything? Do not follow blindly and always look out for your colleagues.

  1. What was the biggest obstacle you’ve faced to get to where you are now? How were you able to overcome it?

To bring an idea to a market ready product is difficult. It is a steep, steep, learning process. Learning from every failure or miscalculation is key to never repeating them. We made some mistakes at every step early in process, but thankfully they cost us more time than money.

We made many connections along the way. Many valuable partnerships and friendships help us maintain our daily momentum.

Capital raising and team building is always hard. I self-funded the majority of this business in the early days, this is called “”skin in the game”. You will never bring in capital through friends or family, and especially angel investors, if you don’t put your own money into your idea. Passion is key, but focus is just as important. Some may not understand your complete vision and that’s ok. Your goal is to convince them and make sure they fully understand it. Your vision has to be easily translated. You still have to listen to others and value their input. I have matured in many ways throughout this process. It is either character building or character destructing. It’s your choice. Be humble and true to your course.

We overcame a great deal of capital needs this past year, the value of these partners were vital to building the foundation of experience this company needed to grow. Always surround yourself with valued members and beware of bringing on friends to your board of managers! Never take “dumb” money from people who don’t understand your vision. If they are willing to invest that’s fine, just don’t add them to your board. Set defined goals for your partners and discuss with them what you expect and above all, put it in writing.

  1. What does your current job allow you to do that traditional nursing did not?

My position as founder of this company allows me to create ideas and bring them to reality. How fun is that? This path allowed me to mature as an effective speaker, listener, father, husband, and follower of God.

Interacting with nurses and providers across the US has given me a deep insight into the challenges we all face as a profession, as an industry. This is the most important wisdom gained.

By creating products that guide process improvements and evolve methodologies of care, I can help minimize the burden that nurses face on the most mundane daily tasks they perform, while allowing them more time to focus on the other daily requirements they are tasked, and more importantly, their patients.

All nurses have ideas for creating better ways to do our jobs, and it’s ok if another better way comes along in the future. Where would we be in medicine or humanity for that matter, if we didn’t evolve our processes?

  1. For nurses who feel stuck in their careers what words of wisdom do you have to help inspire them to break out of their status quo?

Don’t ever be afraid of failing. Be afraid of not trying. Failure often leads to success.

Make sure you have a strong support system involving family, friends, and faith.

  1. What resources can you share nurses wanting to explore creating their own gig that actually pays them?

Reality is, it’s not always glorious. You are often times in a lonely place, serving as both financier and the bathroom attendant, often ridiculed and criticized, and you always hear more no’s than yes’s. It’s humbling and fulfilling. It’s not always the success that ends with a mansion on the hill, and quite frankly it’s a lot of work. What you gain is self-fulfillment, maturity, and the pride of being your own boss. If your goal is to make a difference in the world, than it’s worth more than any pleasure money can give you.

As for money: you need it to start and you need it to maintain. It’s often a revolving cycle in the early days. Understanding cashflow is the key to sustainability! Embrace the mystery of success or failure. Success in not for the weary.

Honestly the best resource I could provide that gives you an insight into creating a business is to watch HBO’s Silicon Valley. It is funny and crass, but the lessons learned over the course of two seasons gives you an idea of the trials and tribulations all entrepreneurs face and the critical mass their decisions or mistakes can take in the early days.

There are plenty of free resources in your states, here are just a few:

Business assistance:

Score 

Small Business & Technology Development Center

Small Business Administration

 

For legal/IP advice please contact me and I can help guide you in the right direction.

If you would like to speak with me, I can make every attempt to provide advice at [email protected]

Now for fun:

  1. What book or publication is currently on your nightstand?

The Lean Start-Up by Eric Ries

  1. If you could only eat one food for the rest of your life what would it be?

A good bowl of Japanese tonkotsu ramen.

  1. How can we get in touch with you?

[email protected]

Please Visit: https://www.infinitusmedical.com/the-ion-esps/

Let me know if you have any questions. Thank you so much for your energy and interest.

Now after you let all of this sink in, please share your biggest take away from David’s interview. How can you apply some of his tips in your life and career?

Until the next installment of Nurse Boss, keep owning your awesome.

xo,

Lisbeth

Are you a Nurse Boss or do you know a Nurse Boss? Please connect with me at 347-766-8773 or email me at [email protected] so we can share you work with the world.

Nurses as Inventors

Nurses are some of the most solution-oriented people on the planet. However, most nurses do not view themselves as creators or designers. I believe nurses need to hone that gift and start to honor it as well.

As a nurse who craves solution oriented thinking matched with creativity, discovering MakerNurse was music to my soul.

Check out what they are all about here: MakerNurse

Have you crafted an invention or solution on the job to make your work easier and to enhance the quality of care for your patients? You did it because that’s what nurses do. We create, improvise, and whip solutions together on the fly without so much as a thought.

Imagine if nurses had access to the resources and funding to develop and build solutions for our everyday tasks that met our patients’ needs and also made our work easier. Win-Win in my book.

Are you a nurse inventor? Please share your story here.

Until next time, keep rocking your inner inventor and owning your awesome.

Lisbeth

Nursing is at a tipping point

Nursing is at a tipping point, what does your #stethoscope say about your nursing path?

What Kelly Johnson, RN and #showmeyourstethoscope revealed to me about nursing

My name is Lisbeth Overton and I am proud to be a registered nurse. I have had the privilege of practicing for seventeen years. My passion has been all things cardiac; especially my time in the electrophysiology lab helping patients suffering from irregular heart rhythms. Giving these patients their quality of life back was beyond rewarding.

Currently I work as a nurse case manager for an insurance company educating customers on how to prevent and/or live well with chronic conditions. I love this role because instead of “fixing” people, I am guiding them to see the correlation between their actions and the outcomes. It is rewarding to empower people to take accountability for their own health and to feel their joy knowing that they can create health and wellness in their own lives, one choice at at time.

I also have a private coaching practice teaching nurses how to leverage their unique gifts, creating the lifestyle of their dreams, where health and career thrive.

It seems like it was so long ago now, but the opportunity with registered nurse, Kelly Johnson had such an impact on me. She was Miss Colorado in the Miss America pageant and for her “talent” she wore the scrubs that she wears at work in her nursing job along with a stethoscope around her neck and shared how moving it was to care for a special patient of hers who was living with Alzheimer’s disease. The next day, she was ridiculed on The View for her “talent” and was reported to have read her patient’s emails for part of her monologue.

I have such gratitude for Kelly Johnson and the courage she displayed in the Miss America pageant. I also have gratitude toward the hosts of The View. If it weren’t for their comments, the depth and breadth of this opportunity would never have reached the scope that it did, nor had the impact. Multiple companies pulled their ads that played during The View’s time slot in support of nurses. Kelly’s courage and the lack of understanding of the hosts on The View created a perfect opportunity, or what my mom always refers to as a “teachable moment”.

I believe that the hosts’ comments came from a lack of understanding of what it is that nurses actually do. While it was disheartening and maddening as a nurse to hear such remarks, I believe it was the best thing to happen to nursing in the last ten years. It is an opportunity for nurses to reflect on how we show up in our profession and to join together to educate the world on what it is that we do and how crucial our profession is now and especially as the landscape of health, wellness, and disease changes.

This opportunity was an invitation to reflect on the nursing profession. If nursing is the most trusted profession, how could we be so disrespected? So, I engaged in the #showmeyourstethoscope and #nursesunited campaigns on Facebook. Just to give you some perspective, these groups had well over 800,000 members. I read countless posts by nurses who shared poignant stories of how they left no stone unturned to try and save a patient or bent over backwards to ensure that connections with family members occurred before a patient took their last breath. There were also thousands of posts by healthcare consumers, specifically moms and dads who had nothing but kindness and gratitude to the droves of nurses who cared for their sweet children and never would have made it without the nurses. I also read stories by men and women and their struggle to get to and through nursing school because that had always been their dream.

I also noticed a theme that weaved its way through so many of the stories. This was the mention of all of the things that did not get cared for by the nurses themselves, commonly seen on social media with the hashtag #nurseproblems. This ranged anywhere from not using the bathroom for ten+ hours to working over twelve+ hours straight, not getting enough sleep, not eating on their breaks because they were understaffed, and not feeling safe at work.

Here is the gift and the curse of being a nurse. Nurses are extremely giving, compassionate, strong-willed, creative, artistic, intelligent, and noble. As such, there tends to be more giving than taking or receiving. There is simply no way to continue to offer this to thousands of patients without first recognizing your own need to heal and recover.

One could argue that there are a gazillion reasons that nursing is where it is today that don’t involve the nurse. But at the end of the day, I would argue that no one can make you feel a certain way and when your body, mind, and soul are completely tapped what good is it, if this is all someone else’s fault?

It is time to start taking accountability for our health and careers. You each have the right of choice. If you are a nurse and are struggling with your health, your job, or your relationships, I would ask yourself, what role am I playing in this? Why is it that I believe I deserve to be treated this way? What can I do to improve this? Often it is when we feel that we have no choice that we give up. Just remember, we each have choice. We each deserve to be treated with respect. Now, I challenge you to reflect on your day to day choices. Are they helping you heal or harming you? Why are you making these choices? Are you asking for help? What could you do differently? Are you part of the problem or part of the solution?

I struggled with health issues and feeling disempowered for quite some time. I had no idea how much power my negative thoughts had on my health and the types of circumstances that kept showing up for me. I have discovered that standing up and standing out is the best thing that has ever happened to me. I have learned how to leverage my own thoughts and energy to my advantage. I am healthier, happier, and more empowered than I have ever been. I am now speaking my truth. My mission is to give back to the nursing profession by helping other nurses do the same. Nurses are the backbone, the glue of care. We have such potential and are at a crossroads right now in the landscape of health care. We can either rise up and own our worth and provide amazing education and care for our world, or we can curl up, stay silent, and stay disempowered. I have experienced both and I certainly prefer thriving.

It is time that nurses stand up, band together and start acting like they matter. To me, it looks something like this.

  • Nurses have a very good understanding of their non-negotiables.
  • Nurses have strong boundaries.
  • Nurses have the opportunity to stay well at the workplace.
  • Nurses have flexibility in their schedules.
  • Nurses are staffed for patient safety.
  • Nurses are board members in health care organizations.
  • Nurses create the life they desire that includes everything they want.
  • Nurses learn to say YES to themselves first without guilt.
  • Nurses learn holistic self-care in every nursing school curriculum.
  • Nurses learn to say NO without guilt.
  • Nurses learn effective communication in nursing school.
  • Nurses ask for what they need from their employer.
  • Nurses ask for support from their managers.
  • Nurses complete unsafe staffing forms.
  • Nurses stand in their power by refraining from the phrase “just a nurse”.
  • Nurses ask for coverage so they can take their breaks.
  • Nurses communicate clearly and effectively.
  • Nurses get support from other nurses who understand what they are going through.
  • Nurses believe that they can make a difference in their own lives.
  • Nurses walk their talk.
  • Nurses demand respect as the professionals they are and will refrain from engaging with anyone who is not honoring that expectation.
  • Nurses respect one another.
  • Nurses help one another.

Nursing is one of the most noble professions on the planet. I am honored to be a nurse. I am on a mission to help nurses stand in their power and become the backbone of healthcare that we are. We are at a tipping point. We need strong, healthy, savvy nurses now more than ever before. If we want to be respected and treated well we have to start acting like we matter. I hate to see nurses go through nursing school just to quit one or two years in because it is too unhealthy and stressful. It does not have to be that way.  A nurse should not have to give up a healthy lifestyle or his/her career because it makes him/her ill.

If you are stuck in a lifestyle of poor health or you are thinking about leaving the nursing profession, I would like to speak with you. I teach nurses how to take what you already have and redesign your life so that you can be your own boss and thrive in your career and your health. Call me today at 347-766-8773 for a complimentary session to discover how I can help you thrive in your health and career. You can also schedule your complimentary session here: http://bit.ly/1VYufS8

Please share below how you act like you matter in life and as a nurse. This is a place for positivity and action.

Wishing you empowerment and great choices today and everyday,

Lisbeth,

Nurse and Creator of Healthy Nurse by Design